Home
  • slide-1.jpg
  • slide-2.jpg
  • slide-3.jpg

spring 2017 heroes

On February 16, 2017, Hank Landau and Sandra Ripley Distelhorst, both members of the Edmonds Mayor’s Climate Protection Committee, interviewed members of the Students Saving Salmon Club of Edmonds-Woodway High School. The following article celebrates their efforts and successes in addressing climate protection-related projects.

The Students Saving Salmon Club at Edmonds-Woodway High School, with 20 student members, has been designated as Sustainable Heroes for 2017 by the Mayor’s Climate Protection Committee (CPC).

The CPC Sustainable Heroes series highlights community members who make a difference by contributing to sustainable climate-related projects. Climate change may impact Edmonds in a number of ways including an overall rise in ambient air temperature and fresh water temperature, rising sea level, wider range of fluctuation in weather (e.g., more severe storms), change in dominant trees, shrubs and plants, and changes to bird, fish and insect populations.

Changes to the fresh water and marine environment are of particular significance to salmon that rely on and navigate both environments. Understanding how salmon navigate the available fresh water estuaries in Edmonds and identifying barriers to their successful spawning can help our community better understand how to mitigate the influences of climate change and other man-made and environmental impacts.

Hank Landau and Sandra Distelhorst – members of the Mayor’s Climate Protection Committee - interviewed several members of the Students Saving Salmon Club (SSSC): Joe Cooper (President), Malia Clark (Vice President), Jared Yu (Secretary), Taylor Blevins, Emily McLaughlin Sta. Maria, Farah Al-Qurishi, and Ava Wilson. Club advisors included Biology teacher Dave Millette, retired NOAA fisheries biologist Joe Scordino, and Valerie Stewart, community advocate.

Every month the Students Saving Salmon Club members take time out of their busy weekend schedules to collect water quality data from several creeks that feed into the Edmonds Marsh as well as samples from the Marsh. Valerie Stewart, club advisor said “This is a very conscientious group who go above and beyond to volunteer their time to help our community.” A few hours a month of water sampling is supported by hours of data entry.

Collecting and recording data is an important part of the project according to Joe Cooper, SSSC President: “Even if conditions are reasonable now, having a baseline is important so you can monitor future activities. In ten or 15 years we will be able to see if any change happened, gradual or dramatic. The data we collect today will still be important in the future.” Students who participated in data entry include: Ava Wilson, Angela Yang, Jared Yu, Erin Francisco, Emily McLaughlin Sta. Maria, Joe Cooper, Taylor Blevins, Sabrina Liu, Malia Clark, Emily Hoang, Natalie Flaherty, Farah Al-Qurishi, Ryan Peterson, along with advisor Joe Scordino.

Students get valuable scientific training from their advisors, including proper data recording and quality control procedures for sample taking. Several students have visited the Edmonds City laboratory to see how the City monitors storm water. The group plans to present their data to the Edmonds City Council at the end of the school year. The report will also include data on stream water quality during and after storm events.

Hands on experience is another one of the most rewarding parts of the club activities according to Cooper: “In biology class everything is hypothetical . . . this happened in this ecosystem somewhere really far way. . . whereas this is a hands-on experience we get to see what is happening right here in our community.”

The students also are involved in community outreach. There are three creeks that provide potential salmon spawning: Shell Creek, Willow Creek and Shellabarger Creek, with only Shell Creek currently supporting some salmon spawning.

The students have been surveying stream property owners about salmon in the creeks. Advisor Joe Scordino noted that creeks that run through private property are difficult to monitor. Scordino was impressed that the students were able to survey all 40 houses along Shell Creek with some property owners welcoming students even on a Saturday morning into their backyard and eager to share their stories of salmon sightings. There is nothing more motivating to protecting the stream in your backyard then actually seeing a salmon in the stream on your property, Scordino noted. It makes you appreciate the need and the honor of protecting their habitat.

Jared Yu, club secretary, found working with property owners challenging but rewarding “It was hard to have to talk to strangers at first but it helped build my confidence and communications skills and overall skills that could be applied to any field.” Going out into the community was also something Taylor Blevins appreciated “Going out to residents’ houses, interacting with residents, and being more involved in community.”

“It was encouraging that a lot of the residents were already taking measures to be safe” Jared Yu said, “and we can help by spreading knowledge of what homeowners can do to prevent contamination and improve stream habitat.” One of the first things the students intend to do with the data they have collected is share it with property owners and get their perspective.

A spike in warm temperatures was noted in March 2016 suggesting the need to closely monitor stream temperature. For salmon a temperature above 64 degree F is too hot for spawning. Encourage stream shading all along the stream can help mitigate spikes in temperatures too warm for salmon.

The students have also collaborated with Sound Salmon Solutions, a non-profit regional enhancement group to obtain a grant that provides funds for water quality tests at an accredited laboratory and for native plants that will be planted along Shell Creek. Students and habitat technicians will offer to work with property owners to plan and plant native vegetation along the streambeds on their properties. Salmon depend on plants for shade and shelter as well as insects as a food source. Many property owners were eager to work with students to monitor the health of the streams running through their property and still other were already taking steps to encourage salmon runs. Some property owners expressed concern about trees or shrubs blocking their view of the stream said “People have to be willing to help, and we have to help inform more people about how to protect the environment” said EWHS Emily McLaughlin Sta. Maria.

Most of the students anticipated moving on to careers that involve environmental studies, medicine, or other paths that help people and the environment. The club gives them the opportunity to explore their future interests. When we asked the students if they were optimistic about their ability to continue to monitor and protect salmon in our streams they enthusiastically agreed. As Hank Landau noted “When young people are optimistic that makes me optimistic.”

It may be difficult to predict the future, but thanks to the Students Saving Salmon Club efforts and the legacy of their database, we will know what happened in the past. Their model of sustainable community action is truly exceptional.

The City of Edmonds continues to identify opportunities for climate protection including actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change. The City is also identifying ways to mitigate the effects of climate change through long-range planning that includes the impact of sea level rise and the rise in temperature along our shorelines and fresh water habitats. See www.edmondswa.gov. To find ways you can contribute to climate protection, check your carbon footprint at the EPA website https://www3.epa.gov/carbon-footprint-calculator/website calculator.

Edmonds Paws in the Water Photo Contest

Edmonds Paws in the Water Photo Contest

Submit your photos of dogs enjoying the water for prizes

(Edmonds - WA)

Edmonds is going to the dogs virtually! Edmonds Parks & Recreation and O.L.A.E. (Off-Leash Area Edmonds) is hosting an online photo contest of your furry friends enjoying the water to win prizes. Winners will be determined by community vote through the Edmonds Parks, Recreation & Cultural Services Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/EdmondsRecZone.

To enter the contest, submit a photo (1) of your dog enjoying any water source (i.e. pool, lake, hose, etc.). Photos can be submitted through email to kim.anderson@edmondswa.gov. To be entered, you must ‘Like’ the Edmonds Parks, Recreation & Cultural Services facebook page @EdmondsRecZone in addition to your photo submission. Photo submissions are accepted from September 28th to October 5th. Photos will be posted to the Paws in the Water Facebook Event.

After submissions close, a photo album through the facebook page will be created. Likes will be considered votes for your favorite photo. Winners are determined by the photos that receive the most likes, and voting will be open October 7th until October 12th.
Winners will be announced via social media on October 14th.

3rd place will receive a $5 gift card from All the Best Pet Care, 2nd place will receive a $10 All the Best Pet Care gift card, and 1st place will receive a $10 All the Best Pet Care gift card and a certification for an initial session at SplashDog valued at $90.

Sponsored by: SplashDog, and All the Best Pet Care.

# # #

City of Edmonds Wastewater Treatment Plant Recognized as “Utility of the Future Today”

The City of Edmonds is only one of three in the state, and one of 65 nationally, to be recognized as a “Utility of the Future Today” — a recognition that celebrates the achievements of water utilities that transition from the traditional wastewater treatment system to a resource recovery center and leader in the overall sustainability and resilience of the communities they serve.

“For the past eight years, we have worked with our partners and the community to create a culture of continuous improvement,” said Pamela Randolph, Wastewater Treatment Manager.

“Each year, we measure our performance and challenge ourselves to always do better on our ‘Pathway to Sustainability,’” said Phil Williams, Public Works Director. “And with the City Council’s decision to move forward with the Carbon Recovery Project, Edmonds is certainly headed in the right direction.”

The Utility of the Future Today program was launched in 2016 by the National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA), the Water Environment Federation (WEF), the Water Research Foundation (WRF) and the WateReuse Association, with input from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

“The Water Environment Federation is excited to recognize the Edmonds WWTP for embracing innovative ways to better serve their communities,” said Jackie Jarrell, WEF President.

“The innovations coming to the water sector present an opportunity for a paradigm shift in the way utilities think about and solve long-standing challenges to clean and reliable water,” said Jarrell. “WEF is excited to recognize the Edmonds WWTP for embracing innovative ways to better serve their communities.”

The Wastewater Treatment Plant cleans everything that runs down the sink, tub or toilet, before sending it into Puget Sound. “The Wastewater treatment plant is the single greatest electricity user in the City, so a reduction of energy cost by 45% translates directly to lower rates for the community we serve,” said Randolph. “This project is one of many sustainability projects the Edmonds Public Works Department is committed to.”

Edmonds WWTP will be recognized during a pre-recorded awards ceremony on Oct. 9 at 8 a.m. PT during WEFTEC Connect.

If you would like to know more about wastewater treatment or our energy-saving projects, please contact Pamela Randolph at 425-771-0237.

To learn more about the Utility of the Future program, visit http://www.wef.org/UtilityoftheFuture or contact UtilityRecognition@wef.org.

Edmonds Diversity Commission Offers Small Grants

Community projects that promote diversity, equity and inclusion sought for funding. The City of Edmonds Diversity Commission is announcing the opening of the application period for the first round of 2021 grant awards. For more information click here. For grant application form and information click here.

Flags at Half Staff in Memory

flag half staffFlags are at half-staff in memory of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who died on September 18, 2020. Flags will remain at half-staff until the day of internment.

City of Edmonds Seeks Diversity Commission Members

Edmonds Diversity Commission has three open positions for three-year terms. Edmonds residents interested in working on issues, programs and activities associated with the changing demographics of our community and enhancing an environment of mutual respect and understanding are encouraged to apply to fill three positions on the City’s Diversity Commission that will be open as of January 1, 2021. For more information click here

**UPDATED** "Coping with Collective Trauma: A Resiliency Toolkit"

Please note the change of date to Wednesday, September 30 at 6 p.m. for "Coping with Collective Trauma: A Resiliency Toolkit" a virtual workshop presented by the Edmonds Diversity Commission. Zoom information has been updated and is available in attached press release. Click here for more information. 

Edmonds CARES Fund Distributes More Than $150,000

$300,000 is still available for housing, groceries, child care, utilities, medical bills

Tapping into the Federal CARES Act Fund and re-allocated City funds, the City of Edmonds continues to distribute funds from its $450,000 “Housing and Supplementary Relief” program, offering grants of up to $1,000 for 1- and 2-member households and $1,500 for households of 3 or more members to cover expenses related to rent/mortgage, food, medical bills, child care, gas or utilities. The only requirement is that residents must earn no more than 60 percent of the Snohomish County Median Income. (Read more)

Latest Housing Survey Results Are In. . . . . .

Among findings, residents like backyard cottages. The results of nearly 700 responses to the second community survey of the Edmonds Housing Commission have been released. In this survey, community members were asked to share their thoughts on six areas related to housing and 16 policy ideas. For more information click here

Face Coverings are REQUIRED on Edmonds Fishing Pier

The City begins outreach campaign to increase compliance

Concerned residents continue to contact the Edmonds Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services team about the Edmonds Fishing Pier. They report that few people are wearing face coverings and it is putting pier visitors at risk. Residents have turned to the City to help.

The City has determined that unless more people mask up, the City will have no choice but to close the fishing pier to all visitors to meet state standards to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Today, the City begins a week-long outreach campaign to increase the number of masked visitors. (Read more)

Edmonds LEAPs into Action to Help Families with School-Age Kids

 

The City pivots to provide daytime programs so parents can work

(Edmonds, WA) When the Edmonds School District announced distance learning for fall 2020, many parents sat down to do some hard thinking: how would they work and manage kids at home simultaneously.

The City of Edmonds Parks Department heard them and spent the last several weeks developing ideas. Today, the City introduces LEAP – Learning Enhancement & Activity Program. LEAP will provide a safe and affordable, on-site recreation program that supports academic efforts for local, school-aged youth as long as practically possible and while Edmonds School District maintains distance learning.

The program repurposes the Frances Anderson Center (FAC) to support children entering second through sixth grade.

“The City can be a steward of our community and we saw this as an innovative way to redirect our community-owned facilities and staff to support our families including those most in need during this very challenging time,” said Edmonds Mayor Mike Nelson. “Plus, I know our parks staff really misses that daily community engagement as much as our community does.”

LEAP Program details

The program will operate Monday – Friday from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and provide day camp activities while supporting ESD distance learning. The program will group similar grade-level kids and staff into weekly pods in the FAC classrooms.

Children can be dropped off/picked up any time of the day with emphasis on pod room scheduling 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Room capacity varies from 10 to 24 and each room will have at least two staff members to provide a 1:10 staff/child ratio minimum. This ratio allows better safety practices, facilitation of distance learning support and will provide the ability to keep pods isolated from one another as much as possible to reduce potential COVID exposure. It also helps contain any potential outbreak to just one pod.

Supplemental programming comes from Environmental Education and Cultural Arts divisions as well as community partners like Sno-King sports to provide additional day camp programming.

Weekly registration is $300 and $345 for non-resident with need-based full scholarships availability for a minimum of 20% of the participants. Program capacity is 100 participants.

On Tuesday, Aug. 25, the City will ask the Council to approve two new positions that will allow the City to move forward with recruiting, hiring and training staff. The program is revenue neutral.

City Seeks Two New Economic Development Commission Members

There are currently two open positions on the Citizens Economic Development Commission (CEDC) for which the City seeks interested applicants.

“Promoting economic activity in Edmonds enhances our quality of life and creates jobs,” commented Mayor Mike Nelson. “Our Economic Development Commissioners provide valuable advice on many issues before the City Council, staff, and the Mayor.” For more information click here