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spring 2017 heroes

On February 16, 2017, Hank Landau and Sandra Ripley Distelhorst, both members of the Edmonds Mayor’s Climate Protection Committee, interviewed members of the Students Saving Salmon Club of Edmonds-Woodway High School. The following article celebrates their efforts and successes in addressing climate protection-related projects.

The Students Saving Salmon Club at Edmonds-Woodway High School, with 20 student members, has been designated as Sustainable Heroes for 2017 by the Mayor’s Climate Protection Committee (CPC).

The CPC Sustainable Heroes series highlights community members who make a difference by contributing to sustainable climate-related projects. Climate change may impact Edmonds in a number of ways including an overall rise in ambient air temperature and fresh water temperature, rising sea level, wider range of fluctuation in weather (e.g., more severe storms), change in dominant trees, shrubs and plants, and changes to bird, fish and insect populations.

Changes to the fresh water and marine environment are of particular significance to salmon that rely on and navigate both environments. Understanding how salmon navigate the available fresh water estuaries in Edmonds and identifying barriers to their successful spawning can help our community better understand how to mitigate the influences of climate change and other man-made and environmental impacts.

Hank Landau and Sandra Distelhorst – members of the Mayor’s Climate Protection Committee - interviewed several members of the Students Saving Salmon Club (SSSC): Joe Cooper (President), Malia Clark (Vice President), Jared Yu (Secretary), Taylor Blevins, Emily McLaughlin Sta. Maria, Farah Al-Qurishi, and Ava Wilson. Club advisors included Biology teacher Dave Millette, retired NOAA fisheries biologist Joe Scordino, and Valerie Stewart, community advocate.

Every month the Students Saving Salmon Club members take time out of their busy weekend schedules to collect water quality data from several creeks that feed into the Edmonds Marsh as well as samples from the Marsh. Valerie Stewart, club advisor said “This is a very conscientious group who go above and beyond to volunteer their time to help our community.” A few hours a month of water sampling is supported by hours of data entry.

Collecting and recording data is an important part of the project according to Joe Cooper, SSSC President: “Even if conditions are reasonable now, having a baseline is important so you can monitor future activities. In ten or 15 years we will be able to see if any change happened, gradual or dramatic. The data we collect today will still be important in the future.” Students who participated in data entry include: Ava Wilson, Angela Yang, Jared Yu, Erin Francisco, Emily McLaughlin Sta. Maria, Joe Cooper, Taylor Blevins, Sabrina Liu, Malia Clark, Emily Hoang, Natalie Flaherty, Farah Al-Qurishi, Ryan Peterson, along with advisor Joe Scordino.

Students get valuable scientific training from their advisors, including proper data recording and quality control procedures for sample taking. Several students have visited the Edmonds City laboratory to see how the City monitors storm water. The group plans to present their data to the Edmonds City Council at the end of the school year. The report will also include data on stream water quality during and after storm events.

Hands on experience is another one of the most rewarding parts of the club activities according to Cooper: “In biology class everything is hypothetical . . . this happened in this ecosystem somewhere really far way. . . whereas this is a hands-on experience we get to see what is happening right here in our community.”

The students also are involved in community outreach. There are three creeks that provide potential salmon spawning: Shell Creek, Willow Creek and Shellabarger Creek, with only Shell Creek currently supporting some salmon spawning.

The students have been surveying stream property owners about salmon in the creeks. Advisor Joe Scordino noted that creeks that run through private property are difficult to monitor. Scordino was impressed that the students were able to survey all 40 houses along Shell Creek with some property owners welcoming students even on a Saturday morning into their backyard and eager to share their stories of salmon sightings. There is nothing more motivating to protecting the stream in your backyard then actually seeing a salmon in the stream on your property, Scordino noted. It makes you appreciate the need and the honor of protecting their habitat.

Jared Yu, club secretary, found working with property owners challenging but rewarding “It was hard to have to talk to strangers at first but it helped build my confidence and communications skills and overall skills that could be applied to any field.” Going out into the community was also something Taylor Blevins appreciated “Going out to residents’ houses, interacting with residents, and being more involved in community.”

“It was encouraging that a lot of the residents were already taking measures to be safe” Jared Yu said, “and we can help by spreading knowledge of what homeowners can do to prevent contamination and improve stream habitat.” One of the first things the students intend to do with the data they have collected is share it with property owners and get their perspective.

A spike in warm temperatures was noted in March 2016 suggesting the need to closely monitor stream temperature. For salmon a temperature above 64 degree F is too hot for spawning. Encourage stream shading all along the stream can help mitigate spikes in temperatures too warm for salmon.

The students have also collaborated with Sound Salmon Solutions, a non-profit regional enhancement group to obtain a grant that provides funds for water quality tests at an accredited laboratory and for native plants that will be planted along Shell Creek. Students and habitat technicians will offer to work with property owners to plan and plant native vegetation along the streambeds on their properties. Salmon depend on plants for shade and shelter as well as insects as a food source. Many property owners were eager to work with students to monitor the health of the streams running through their property and still other were already taking steps to encourage salmon runs. Some property owners expressed concern about trees or shrubs blocking their view of the stream said “People have to be willing to help, and we have to help inform more people about how to protect the environment” said EWHS Emily McLaughlin Sta. Maria.

Most of the students anticipated moving on to careers that involve environmental studies, medicine, or other paths that help people and the environment. The club gives them the opportunity to explore their future interests. When we asked the students if they were optimistic about their ability to continue to monitor and protect salmon in our streams they enthusiastically agreed. As Hank Landau noted “When young people are optimistic that makes me optimistic.”

It may be difficult to predict the future, but thanks to the Students Saving Salmon Club efforts and the legacy of their database, we will know what happened in the past. Their model of sustainable community action is truly exceptional.

The City of Edmonds continues to identify opportunities for climate protection including actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change. The City is also identifying ways to mitigate the effects of climate change through long-range planning that includes the impact of sea level rise and the rise in temperature along our shorelines and fresh water habitats. See www.edmondswa.gov. To find ways you can contribute to climate protection, check your carbon footprint at the EPA website https://www3.epa.gov/carbon-footprint-calculator/website calculator.

Walkable Main Street Returns!

walkable main3After a hiatus over the holiday weekend, and in response to great community support, Main Street will again be closed to vehicles from 3rd to 6th Avenues on Saturday 10am to 10pm and Sunday 10am to 9pm to allow for:

  • a larger, safer area for pedestrian flow, allowing for social distancing while strolling
  • seating for restaurants and cafés, allowing for safer outdoor dining
  • outdoor sales or display for retailers
  • members of the public to return to Downtown Edmonds in a more welcoming and safer manner and to re-engage with shops, services, and restaurants

 

Please view the map attached to this post for a diagram of the street closure and availability of nearby parking. map

Walkable Main Street will continue on Saturdays and Sundays for the foreseeable future.

Please patronize all our wonderful retail shops and services while enjoying Walkable Main Street!

Edmonds Offers Grants for Local Small Businesses

Second Round of Grants for City’s Most Vulnerable Residents Also Opens

(Edmonds, WA) - After City Council approval on June 23rd, grants of up to $10,000 are now available to small businesses in Edmonds to help provide relief to the economic blow created by the COVID-19 economic crisis. As part of the “Edmonds Cares Fund,” Business Support Grants will provide individual businesses up to $10,000. The total grant pool is $700,000.

The City Council also approved increased funding for a second round of grants to local lower-income residents who are often the most hard-hit by loss of employment and increased expenses brought on by the crisis. continue reading

Public Notice for Wastewater Treatment Incinerator Replacement Project

public hearing 300x275The Edmonds City Council will hold an optional public hearing to receive residents’ comments on the proposed Wastewater Treatment Incinerator Replacement project on July 7 at 7 pm.

The $26 million project replaces the existing 30-year old mechanical incinerator which is nearly a decade beyond the end of its useful life and has become increasingly expensive to maintain due to more stringent air quality standards. The replacement project complies with all current standards and aligns with state and local climate action targets.

The City has fully researched available options, has developed a recommended solution. We are now seeking Council approval to move forward with this recommended option.

The City Council meeting will begin at 7:00 p.m. via the Zoom Platform. Residents may connect with a computer or smart phone at: https://zoom.us/s/4257752525 or join the meeting by phone at: 888 475 4499 (Toll Free) or 877 853 5257 (Toll Free) Meeting ID 425 775 2525.  

Written comments are welcomed prior to the public hearing. Please submit to Maureen.Judge@edmondswa.gov.

Dayton Street Construction Update: 8th Ave Intersection Closure

Dayton Street construction update: upcoming 8th Ave intersection closure:

Crews plan to close the 8th Ave and Dayton Street intersection from Monday, July 6 to Thursday, July 9.  During the closure, crews will finish the intersection, build a new center island and complete the paving work in that same area.  This is part of the larger multi-phase Dayton Project to upgrade utilities. 

During this closure:
• The intersection of 8th Avenue and Dayton will be closed to all vehicle traffic daily from Monday, July 6 through Thursday, July 9 between 7 am and 5 pm. 
• The intersection will be open during evening hours.
• Access to businesses, driveways, and parking lots will be maintained
• The sidewalks at the 8th Ave intersection will be open; pedestrian detours crossing the intersection will be in place.
 
Community Transit rerouted during Phase 2 construction Community Transit Route 116 has been rerouted between 3rd and 9th avenues for Phase 2 construction. Several stops along Dayton Street have been relocated for the duration of construction. For up-to-date details about bus routes, please visit Community Transit’s rider alerts page.
 
How to stay informed - COVID-19: For updates on what the City of Edmonds is doing to respond to the COVID-19 outbreak, visit: http://www.edmondswa.gov/coronavirus.html
• Website: Please stay tuned to our website for regular updates: http://www.edmondswa.gov/dayton-street-utility-improvements.html
• Email: If you have questions or comments, email us at daytonproject@edmondswa.gov
• Twitter: You can also follow project progress on Twitter at @DaytonStProject

The City of Edmonds is working to manage our community’s needs for support and safety as COVID-19 continues to impact us all. Please note the construction schedule is subject change as we receive new information. For more information about actions the City of Edmonds is taking, please visit http://www.edmondswa.gov/coronavirus.html.

Edmonds Parks and Recreation Re-opens Summer Camp Registration

prcsFrom acting to robotics to football to outdoor adventures, Edmonds Parks has it all  

(Edmonds, WA) It has been a very tough year for both kids and parents. That’s why the City of Edmonds is happy to share information about the 50+summer camp opportunities available as soon as Edmonds moves into COVID-19 Safe Start Phase 3. continue reading

The City Helps Businesses with Phase 2 Compliance

Scheduled site visits offer support and direction, not penalties

(Edmonds, WA) -   COVID-19 restrictions have been tough on local businesses. To help businesses adapt to the new rules and changing requirements, Development Services staff will delay some current work to go to local businesses for site visits.

“Business owners have a lot on their mind with scheduling and managing the financial impact of COVID and closures,” said Shane Hope, Development Services Director. “We want to connect them to accurate information and where to get supplies like masks and other protective things they might need so they can reopen and customers can feel good about going inside and doing business with them.”

These visits aren’t punitive and the city isn’t handing out tickets. Staff will inform workers and owners on the guidelines.

Last week, the City sent all 2200 business owners a postcard with links to useful information about grants, loans, and additional support. Last Friday, staff began the site visits. Teams will focus on restaurants, bars, retail and personal services like salons.

Business can set up a time with Development Services team members by calling 425.771.0220. The team will also make spot visits around town. Business owners can also check the City’s business support page at www.edmondswa.gov/covid-business. It is updated frequently.

Back by Popular Demand: Pedestrian-Friendly Main Street Returns and Expands June 27-28

june 27 28

Area around Fountain will close in addition to Main Street for more pleasant pedestrian experience

(Edmonds, WA) -   Last weekend’s Walkable Main Street Pilot Project was so popular that Edmonds City Mayor Mike Nelson announced the City will do it again this weekend, June 27 and 28. Based on feedback, more street sections will close for outdoor dining and walking, and the timeframe will expand. continue reading

City Council Resumes Live Public Comment at Council Meetings via Zoom

EDMONDS CITY COUNCIL MEETINGS ARE HELD EVERY TUESDAY EVENING AT 7 PM, EXCEPT FOR THE FIFTH TUESDAY OF A MONTH UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTICED. DUE TO THE CORONAVIRUS, MEETINGS ARE CURRENTLY BEING HELD VIRTUALLY.

OIPTo provide Public Comment at an Edmonds City Council Meeting, at the beginning of the meeting click on the link below or call one of the listed toll free numbers. You will be connected to the meeting waiting room. When it is your turn to speak you will be admitted to the meeting for your 3-minute public comment. When admitted, please state your name and city of residence before providing your comments. You can also submit your written comments (450 word maximum) via email to publiccomment@edmondswa.gov. PLEASE NOTE:
                                                               the meeting cannot be viewed at the Public Comment link.

                                                               https://zoom.us/s/4257752525

or call toll free: 888-475-4499 or 877-853-5257 | Meeting ID: 425 775 2525

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To VIEW the Edmonds City Council Meeting:

Click on the following link ~ http://edmondswa.iqm2.com/Citizens/default.aspx

View on one of the following cable channels: Comcast channel 21 | Ziply channel 39

Listen on your telephone by calling 712-775-7270 ~ access code 583224

Edmonds Mayor Nelson Seeks Applicants for Equity and Justice Advisory Task Force

Racial diversity and geographic diversity are highly valued

(Edmonds, WA) - Last week, Edmonds Mayor Mike Nelson shared his intention to create an Equity and Justice Task Force to help identify and correct systemic and implicit bias, and barriers to inclusion and equity within city operations. The desired outcome would be a set of recommended policies and procedures for the Police Department and City Hall that would address bias and inequities perpetrated on African-American residents, people of color and other minorities within our community. continue reading

Pedestrian-Friendly Weekend Coming to Main Street June 20-21

Main street 2Road closed between 3rd and 6th Avenues for outdoor dining and walking

(Edmonds, WA) - Edmonds Mayor Mike Nelson announced the dates for the first pedestrian-friendly weekend along Main Street. The weekend of June 20-21, which is Father’s Day weekend and the first official weekend of summer, the City will close Main Street to vehicle traffic between Third and Sixth Avenues, opening the street to pedestrians and local businesses who want to move outdoors. He encourages businesses in other areas, like Westgate, Five Corners, and in the Highway 99 Corridor to also move tables outside. continue reading

Photo courtesy of Edmonds Downtown Alliance

Wastewater Treatment Plant Incinerator Project and Recommendations

(Edmonds, WA) - 3rd-party independent reviewer, Dr. David Parry, supports staff recommendations for The City of Edmonds Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Incinerator Replacement Project 

The June 16, 2020 City Council presentation by Public Works Director, Phil Williams, will offer recommendations after study of pyrolises and gasification with biosolids management as options for the Regional Wastewater Incinerator Replacement project. Dr. David Parry, the City's 3rd-Party Independent Reviewer has offered insight and his recommendation on biochar and the choice between biosolids management with gasification and the use of pyrolises.  


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