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MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2020: Governor Inslee "Stay Home Stay Healthy" Order For business related inquiries please call 425.275.4823
City Council Meetings under Gubernatorial Proclamation 
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Visit a Park

To get more information about Edmonds Parks click here.
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Urban Forest Management Plan

We are in the process of developing an Urban Forest Management Plan. Click here for up-to-date project info.

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Coronavirus Information

Click Here for more information.
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Citizens' Housing Commission

Follow along at the project website.

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Highway 99 Corridor / Subarea Planning

The Highway 99 Subarea Plan is a vision for land use and transportation along the corridor.  You can find more information here.

spring 2017 heroes

On February 16, 2017, Hank Landau and Sandra Ripley Distelhorst, both members of the Edmonds Mayor’s Climate Protection Committee, interviewed members of the Students Saving Salmon Club of Edmonds-Woodway High School. The following article celebrates their efforts and successes in addressing climate protection-related projects.

The Students Saving Salmon Club at Edmonds-Woodway High School, with 20 student members, has been designated as Sustainable Heroes for 2017 by the Mayor’s Climate Protection Committee (CPC).

The CPC Sustainable Heroes series highlights community members who make a difference by contributing to sustainable climate-related projects. Climate change may impact Edmonds in a number of ways including an overall rise in ambient air temperature and fresh water temperature, rising sea level, wider range of fluctuation in weather (e.g., more severe storms), change in dominant trees, shrubs and plants, and changes to bird, fish and insect populations.

Changes to the fresh water and marine environment are of particular significance to salmon that rely on and navigate both environments. Understanding how salmon navigate the available fresh water estuaries in Edmonds and identifying barriers to their successful spawning can help our community better understand how to mitigate the influences of climate change and other man-made and environmental impacts.

Hank Landau and Sandra Distelhorst – members of the Mayor’s Climate Protection Committee - interviewed several members of the Students Saving Salmon Club (SSSC): Joe Cooper (President), Malia Clark (Vice President), Jared Yu (Secretary), Taylor Blevins, Emily McLaughlin Sta. Maria, Farah Al-Qurishi, and Ava Wilson. Club advisors included Biology teacher Dave Millette, retired NOAA fisheries biologist Joe Scordino, and Valerie Stewart, community advocate.

Every month the Students Saving Salmon Club members take time out of their busy weekend schedules to collect water quality data from several creeks that feed into the Edmonds Marsh as well as samples from the Marsh. Valerie Stewart, club advisor said “This is a very conscientious group who go above and beyond to volunteer their time to help our community.” A few hours a month of water sampling is supported by hours of data entry.

Collecting and recording data is an important part of the project according to Joe Cooper, SSSC President: “Even if conditions are reasonable now, having a baseline is important so you can monitor future activities. In ten or 15 years we will be able to see if any change happened, gradual or dramatic. The data we collect today will still be important in the future.” Students who participated in data entry include: Ava Wilson, Angela Yang, Jared Yu, Erin Francisco, Emily McLaughlin Sta. Maria, Joe Cooper, Taylor Blevins, Sabrina Liu, Malia Clark, Emily Hoang, Natalie Flaherty, Farah Al-Qurishi, Ryan Peterson, along with advisor Joe Scordino.

Students get valuable scientific training from their advisors, including proper data recording and quality control procedures for sample taking. Several students have visited the Edmonds City laboratory to see how the City monitors storm water. The group plans to present their data to the Edmonds City Council at the end of the school year. The report will also include data on stream water quality during and after storm events.

Hands on experience is another one of the most rewarding parts of the club activities according to Cooper: “In biology class everything is hypothetical . . . this happened in this ecosystem somewhere really far way. . . whereas this is a hands-on experience we get to see what is happening right here in our community.”

The students also are involved in community outreach. There are three creeks that provide potential salmon spawning: Shell Creek, Willow Creek and Shellabarger Creek, with only Shell Creek currently supporting some salmon spawning.

The students have been surveying stream property owners about salmon in the creeks. Advisor Joe Scordino noted that creeks that run through private property are difficult to monitor. Scordino was impressed that the students were able to survey all 40 houses along Shell Creek with some property owners welcoming students even on a Saturday morning into their backyard and eager to share their stories of salmon sightings. There is nothing more motivating to protecting the stream in your backyard then actually seeing a salmon in the stream on your property, Scordino noted. It makes you appreciate the need and the honor of protecting their habitat.

Jared Yu, club secretary, found working with property owners challenging but rewarding “It was hard to have to talk to strangers at first but it helped build my confidence and communications skills and overall skills that could be applied to any field.” Going out into the community was also something Taylor Blevins appreciated “Going out to residents’ houses, interacting with residents, and being more involved in community.”

“It was encouraging that a lot of the residents were already taking measures to be safe” Jared Yu said, “and we can help by spreading knowledge of what homeowners can do to prevent contamination and improve stream habitat.” One of the first things the students intend to do with the data they have collected is share it with property owners and get their perspective.

A spike in warm temperatures was noted in March 2016 suggesting the need to closely monitor stream temperature. For salmon a temperature above 64 degree F is too hot for spawning. Encourage stream shading all along the stream can help mitigate spikes in temperatures too warm for salmon.

The students have also collaborated with Sound Salmon Solutions, a non-profit regional enhancement group to obtain a grant that provides funds for water quality tests at an accredited laboratory and for native plants that will be planted along Shell Creek. Students and habitat technicians will offer to work with property owners to plan and plant native vegetation along the streambeds on their properties. Salmon depend on plants for shade and shelter as well as insects as a food source. Many property owners were eager to work with students to monitor the health of the streams running through their property and still other were already taking steps to encourage salmon runs. Some property owners expressed concern about trees or shrubs blocking their view of the stream said “People have to be willing to help, and we have to help inform more people about how to protect the environment” said EWHS Emily McLaughlin Sta. Maria.

Most of the students anticipated moving on to careers that involve environmental studies, medicine, or other paths that help people and the environment. The club gives them the opportunity to explore their future interests. When we asked the students if they were optimistic about their ability to continue to monitor and protect salmon in our streams they enthusiastically agreed. As Hank Landau noted “When young people are optimistic that makes me optimistic.”

It may be difficult to predict the future, but thanks to the Students Saving Salmon Club efforts and the legacy of their database, we will know what happened in the past. Their model of sustainable community action is truly exceptional.

The City of Edmonds continues to identify opportunities for climate protection including actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change. The City is also identifying ways to mitigate the effects of climate change through long-range planning that includes the impact of sea level rise and the rise in temperature along our shorelines and fresh water habitats. See www.edmondswa.gov. To find ways you can contribute to climate protection, check your carbon footprint at the EPA website https://www3.epa.gov/carbon-footprint-calculator/website calculator.

Mayor Nelson Announces $200,000 Community Relief Fund

Three Local Non-Profits to Receive Funds
 
(Edmonds, WA) Recognizing the enormous impact COVID-19 has had on local businesses, our senior population and our most vulnerable residents, Edmonds Mayor Mike Nelson announced the creation of a Community and Economic Relief Fund from which the City of Edmonds will make available $200,000 to nonprofit community organizations. read more

Edmonds Accepts Applications for 2021 Tourism Promotion Grants

Grants Awarded for Arts, Culture or Other Events

(Edmonds, WA) Looking ahead to 2021, the City of Edmonds has opened up its annual application period for Tourism Promotion Grants for events, programs and activities scheduled for next year. The grants are funded by the City’s lodging tax revenue, based on the recommendations of the Edmonds Lodging Tax Advisory Committee (LTAC). These recommendations, reviewed and approved by City Council in the annual City of Edmonds budget, include awarding grants to organizations that produce and promote arts, culture or other events or programs that bring visitors to Edmonds. Applications for 2021 are now available and will be accepted until 4:30 pm, May 29, 2020. read more

City Council Meetings under Gubernatorial Proclamation

On March 24, 2020, the Governor issued Proclamation 20-28 (Open Public Meetings Act and Public Records Act) to, among other things, temporarily prohibit in-person public attendance at meetings subject to the OPMA. To ensure that the public has the necessary means to continue their critical oversight role of Edmonds City Council meetings, the City will continue to live-stream its Council meetings on its website and Government Access Channels 21 (Comcast) and 39 (Frontier). In addition, the City is temporarily providing for call-in capability for the public to listen by phone. The dial-in number is (712) 775-7270. Enter Access Code 583224 to be connected. Furthermore, an additional email address has been created for the public to submit audience comments to the City Council: publiccomment@edmondswa.gov. These additional measures will be in place during the period in which in-person attendance is not allowed under the Governor’s order.

Reporting Violations of the Governer's Proclamation

Business Violations of the Stay-at-Home Order can be reported here: https://app.smartsheet.com/b/form/09349a1c56844b539fea1c2cabd16d56

More info at: https://coronavirus.wa.gov/spread-facts

To report an individual(s) violation call 425-407-3999

City Unveils New Ways to Support Local Businesses During Shutdown

(Edmonlove Edmondsds, WA) – The City of Edmonds, partnering with local business leaders and business organizations, is proud to announce a new, easier way to keep Edmonds residents informed and businesses in business. Today, the City unveiled a new site, LoveEdmonds to connect home-bound residents to business and services that are providing take-out, delivery, online shopping, gift cards and/or “shop-forward” options. read more

Edmonds Hires New Public Information Officer

J HolterEDMONDS HIRES NEW PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER

(Edmonds, WA) - The City of Edmonds is pleased to announce the hiring of a new half-time Public Information Officer/Communications Strategist. Jamie Holter started Tuesday, March 17, 2020.

Jamie has worked in state and county communications for more than 15 years and is thrilled to bring her wealth of experience to our City. read more

Edmonds Mayor Mike Nelson Calls Special City Council Meeting

Meeting Set for 3 p.m. Friday, March 27, 2020

(Edmonds, WA) – Edmonds Mayor Mike Nelson has called a special Edmonds City Council meeting for 3 p.m. on Friday, March 27, 2020. He will ask Council to consider two actions. One will be to revise the amendments to Edmonds City Code (ECC) Chapter 6.60 (“Disaster Preparation, Emergency Coordination, and Civil Emergencies”) approved by City Council in Special Session last Sunday, March 22, 2020. Related to that Chapter, the Mayor will specifically ask for Council support for an amendment to Section 6.60.090 (which lays out items that could potentially be invoked by order of a mayor in case of emergency) by removing Subsection G related to carrying or possessing firearms with intent to do bodily harm. 

He will also ask Council to temporarily lift the plastic bag ban at ECC Chapter 6.80 to allow grocery stores to use plastic bags for the safer handling and take-out of merchandise. 

This meeting will be conducted virtually and live­-streamed on the city’s website and on TV21. Council Chambers will not be open, in compliance with Governor Inslee’s temporary, partial suspension of the Open Public Meetings Act to prevent the gathering of people in a single location.

Members of the public are welcome to comment via email at council@edmondswa.gov | Press Release

City of Edmonds Updates COVID-19 Information - March 24, 2020

(Edmonds, WA) - In continued observance of City Council’s earlier decision, and in compliance with the Mayor’s Stay at Home order, tonight’s Edmonds City Council meeting will be conducted virtually and streamed live on the City’s website. Council Chambers will be open to the public, as is required by law. We ask that visitors sit at least six feet apart. Neither the Mayor nor Councilmembers will be in Chambers. 

Public comment for the meeting may be sent to City Council via email at council@edmondswa.gov. read more

Mayor Nelson to Hold Press Conference on Edmonds COVID-19 Related Emergency Order

Press Conference at 2:30pm in Plaza in Front of Public Safety
Complex, 250 5th Avenue North, Edmonds 


(Edmonds, WA) - Mayor Mike Nelson, joined by Interim Police Chief Jim Lawless, will hold a press conference at 2:30pm today regarding his Order, issued yesterday, on COVID-19-related precautions and stay-at-home order now in effect. The press conference will be held outside in the plaza in front of the Edmonds Public Safety Complex.

Members of the press are encouraged to attend instead of making direct contact to the Mayor’s Office today. After remarks by both Mayor Nelson and Interim Chief Lawless, questions from the press will be entertained. 

For continuing information about the status of local COVID-19-related developments, you may visit the City’s website at: http://www.edmondswa.gov/coronavirus.html

Edmonds Mayor Nelson COVID-19 Update

Edmonds Mayor Mike Nelson outlines latest covid-19 RESPONSE plans

Measures and Proposals to Support People and Business

(Edmonds, WA) - Mayor Mike Nelson today shared updated information about how the City of Edmonds will function during these unpredictable times. “We are looking at conventional and unconventional ways to support our residents and our businesses,” said Mayor Nelson. “With the support of our City staff and our City Council, I am eager to move forward with some tangible, immediate solutions.” read more

Edmonds Mayor Nelson Updates Residents and Businesses on COVID-19 Information

Measures and Proposals to Help Local Business and Reduce the Spread of COVID-19

Mayor Mike Nelson today issued a series of decisions to support local residents and business owners, a tough decision regarding local parks, and a reminder to use 911 for life-safety emergencies only. “We are doing our very best to manage our community’s needs for support and safety during these fast-changing times,” said Mayor Nelson. Press Release

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