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CityPark

Visit a Park

To get more information about Edmonds Parks click here.
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Urban Forest Management Plan

We need your input! Click here for up-to-date project info.

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Highway 99 Corridor / Subarea Planning

The Highway 99 Subarea Plan is underway to develop a vision for land use and transportation along the corridor. Click here to visit the project website. You can also find more information here.
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76th Ave & 212th St Intersection Improvements

Click here for project information and updates.
For many of us, washing our car or truck is as American as baseball and apple pie. It’s hard to imagine that there’s a connection between keeping your car clean and keeping our streams, lakes, and marine waters clean and healthy. It’s harder still to believe that one person washing their car can really cause any harm.  However, thousands of people washing their cars can be a serious problem. So before you grab the bucket, sponge, and the hose, let’s talk about some of the aspects of washing your car that we should be concerned with.

Where Does the Washwater Go?
soap runoffCar washwater and rinse water contain a mixture of detergents, oils, heavy metals and other pollutants that we wash off of our vehicles. If this washwater flows along the street, it can enter a storm drain, and then flow to Edmonds’ streams and lakes or directly into Puget Sound. This soapy, polluted water is untreated and can kill aquatic plants and animals. Don’t forget, a storm drain is the entrance to a system of underground pipes that collects and carries water from streets and parking lots, and discharges it untreated into Puget Sound, and our lakes, streams and wetlands.

Is Car Washing Illegal?
No! Washing your vehicle is not illegal. But discharge of the soapy, dirty washwater into the storm drain is technically a violation of federal, state, and City regulations. However, per Department of Ecology recommendation, the City has adopted an educational rather than enforcement approach to car washing.   For more information from the Department of Ecology, go to www.ecy.wa.gov/washington_waters/carwash.html or www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/wq/stormwater/CarWash.html.

soapy streamWhat About Soaps?
All soaps, including biodegradable ones, can harm our waterways. Soaps break the surface tension of water, lowering the oxygen level which is harmful to fish and other aquatic life. The worst soaps contain phosphates, which can cause unwanted algae blooms in surface waters. And don’t forget — car washwater is a mixture or soap, oil, grease, and heavy metals.
 
What Should I Do To Keep Our Waters Clean?save our salmon copy
  • Take your car to a commercial car wash facility that discharges its washwater to the sewer system, where it’s treated or recycled.
  • When washing your car at home, wash it on the lawn (or other vegetated area) to keep the water out of the storm drain.   Mild, soapy water won’t hurt your lawn; it will actually water it!
  • Wash your car on an area that drains to your lawn/vegetated area.
  • Use waterless car wash products, available at auto parts stores, supermarkets, and online. Saves water too!!
  • Find a community car wash that uses a car wash kit and disposes of the wash water to the sewer system.

To Keep Our Creeks Clean, Use a Car Wash Kit.

If you’re organizing a charity car wash, the City of Edmonds has two SudSafe Car Wash Kits available to community groups and schools to encourage you to run environmentally-friendly car wash events. Each kit has all the equipment you’ll need - hoses, safety cones, and a basin to capture and divert the soapy water away from the storm drain and onto a lawn (or other vegetated area) or into a sink that drains to the sanitary sewer. See contact information below to reserve a kit.

car wash kitSite Requirements for using SudSafe Car Wash Kit
  • Electric power within 100 ft. of the wash area.
  • Grass/gravel/vegetated area within 100 ft. of the wash area, or a
  • Sink/toilet that leads to sewer system within 100 ft. of wash area.

Other Ways to Wash Your Car and Keep Edmonds Clean and Green.

  • Use a shut-off nozzle on your hose to conserve water.
  • Choose a soap that has little or no phosphates, is biodegradable, and contains no chlorine, bleach, nitrates, or ammonia. Avoid labels with “Caution,” “Danger,” or “Warning.” The soapy water will be kinder to your lawn or other vegetated area.
  • Use a small amount of soap! You don’t need a bucketful of suds.
  • If you live in a condominium complex, ask your Homeowners Association to purchase a SudSafe Car Wash Kit for use at your complex. This kit will allow you to wash your vehicle in your parking lot and not discharge the wash water to the storm drains.

Questions or comments? Contact Mike Cawrse, City of Edmonds Stormwater Technician, at (425) 771-0220 x1322 or michael.cawrse@edmondswa.gov.Puget Sound Starts Here


Flag Lowering 9/11 Patriot Day

flag half staffMonday, September 11, 2017 until close of business ~ by direction of Governor Jay Inslee, flags are to be flown at half-staff for national Patriot Day, the annual memorial to the victims of the 2001 tragedy.

Edmonds Receives $700,000 State Grant to Forward Waterfront Connector Project

State money matched by $295,000 in local funding to begin design, environmental and permitting work. To see press release click here.

Edmonds Achieves SolSmart Award - First in WA State...

The City of Edmonds is receiving national recognition for its efforts to promote solar energy. SolSmart, a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative, is awarding a Bronze designation to the City for taking important first steps to promote solar energy production and usage. Edmonds is the first city in the state to achieve this designation. Read more here.

Highway 99 Plan & Code Kick In

The Highway 99 Area Plan and code update approved by the City Council on August are effective today, August 25th. Read more about this planning effort here. The adopted plan and code documents can be viewed here by looking under the "Documents" tab.

Charlottesville and Beyond

By Mayor Dave Earling

I seldom comment on national issues, but the wrong in Charlottesville and the resulting failure of leadership and national outcry this past weekend points out wrongs on so many levels. read more

Bike2Health Project - Bicycle Counts Continue

Bicycle Counts Continue
Edmonds is continuing to conduct bicycle counts to understand how many people currently ride bikes in the streets where the proposed bicycle routes / bike lanes will be added later this Fall. Counts will also be completed after construction in order to determine how the new routes affect ridership. These counts are occurring quarterly until Fall 2017. The bicycle counts are scheduled for June 27th through June 29th at the following locations:

·        76th Avenue W & Olympic View Drive
·        9th Avenue S & Walnut Street
·        76th Avenue W & 212th Street SW
·        80th Avenue W & 224th Street SW 

Urban Forest Management Plan - Survey Now Available

The City of Edmonds is working to develop an Urban Forest Management Plan that will primarily focus on managing trees on public properties and in public rights-of-way.  The plan will also consider some community-wide issues, for example, the community's total tree canopy, the role of trees in critical wildlife habitat corridors throughout the city and opportunities for public education.

Public input is welcome, so please tell us your thoughts by taking this SURVEY.

Open House to Discuss Managing City’s Tree Cover

A public open house about managing the City’s trees will be held June 22, Thursday in the Brackett Room (3rd floor) of City Hall, 121 Fifth Avenue North, Edmonds.  The public can drop by anytime between 6:30 and 8:00 pm.  A presentation will be given at 7:00 pm.

“We want to share information and hear from people,” said Mayor Dave Earling, “about how the City’s urban forest— the trees and tree canopy—should be managed over the long term.  For example, do we need more trees in some places?  What kind?  Should all trees be saved, no matter what?” 

Development of an urban forest management plan for Edmonds is underway.  It follows up on discussion from two years ago of a draft tree code that would have affected the planting and cutting of trees on private property.

When the City Council determined to not adopt the draft tree code, the Council confirmed that it wanted to find the right balance for managing trees and to especially consider trees in the right of way and on public property.  An urban forest management could help do this.

Last year, a consulting firm, Davey Resource Group, was chosen to help develop an urban forest management plan for Edmonds.  The firm has been gathering information from Tree Board members and City staff.  Now broader public outreach is beginning.

The June 22 open house will show what’s been learned so far about the City’s tree canopy and managing trees in an urban environment.  Everyone is invited. 

The first and last parts of the open house will allow people to view displays and talk informally.  At 7:00 pm, a presentation will be given about the scope of the urban forest plan and next steps to develop it.  Questions and comments are welcome.

Edmonds & WWU Celebrate Completion of Successful Sustainable Cities Partnership

Joint endeavor of City of Edmonds staff and Western Washington University students covered a wide array of projects. For more information click here.

Free Small Business Workshop for Edmonds Businesses

Edmonds Business Owners To Get a Boost from Free Small Business Workshop. Click here for more information.

Edmonds Diversity Commission Offers Small Grants

The Edmonds Diversity Commission offers small grants for community projects that promote diversity, equity, and inclusion sought for funding. For more information see press release here. For application click here.

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