Home
bracketts landing 1 365x186

Visit a Park

To get more information about Edmonds Parks click here.
UFMP leaves module 01

Urban Forest Management Plan

We are in the process of developing an Urban Forest Management Plan. Click here for up-to-date project info.

At grade task force

Edmonds Street Waterfront Connector

Click here to learn more about the project.
emonds logo v5 2017 1121 01

Edmonds Housing Strategy

Follow along at the project website
Highway 99 photo graphic

Highway 99 Corridor / Subarea Planning

The Highway 99 Subarea Plan is a vision for land use and transportation along the corridor.  You can find more information here.
76th 212th Aerial

76th Ave & 212th St Intersection Improvements

Click here for project information and updates.

Stormwater Management
Streamside Landowners
Best Management Practices (BMPs)

 

We are lucky to live in one of the most wildlife-rich places in the world.. By ensuring that streamside activities have beneficial impacts instead of harmful impacts, and that they enhance habitat-forming natural processes instead of stopping them, you can improve stream health and wildlife habitat for generations to come.

The most important things you can do to create good wildlife habitat are also the most important things you can do for your stream:

    1. Leave Your Streambanks Natural:  Healthy streams are bordered by native trees and shrubs, and are crossed with fallen logs and roots that catch and hold sediment, leaves, and debris.  It may look untidy, but such natural clutter is essential to the health of rivers and streams.  Trees, shrubs, and roots, stabilize streambanks and reduce erosion.  Logs and branches in streams slow water velocity and protect streambanks and streamside plants from being swept away in high winter flows.  Fallen trees help create gravel bars where salmon and trout spawn.
    2. Plant Native Plants:  Native plants are suited to our local climate and soils so they don’t require watering, fertilizer, or pesticides. Native plants are hosts for many species of beneficial insects that serve as pollinators, food for salmon, trout and birds, and predators of harmful insects. They also provide seeds and fruit for birds. Salmon depend on native plants for shade, shelter (young salmon hide in overhanging shrubs at all times of the year), food (the mayflies, stoneflies, and caddisflies that salmon eat all need native plants), and leaf litter.
    3. Plant Trees: Shrubs, especially native shrubs, are very good for streams. Trees, however, provide many services that shrubs and smaller plants cannot. Living trees provide shade that keeps water cool. They provide food such as beneficial insects. They also provide leaves, needles, twigs and branches for the insects, amphibians and fish that live in the streams. Dead and fallen trees provide habitat for insects, amphibians and fish. They create pools that control sediment and nutrient movement. They slow the flow of water, reducing erosion and property damage.

Cartoon of fish.

    1. Limit Use of Lawn Chemicals:  Most lawn chemicals can harm your stream.
  • Pesticides designed to kill terrestrial insects can also kill aquatic insects such as the mayflies, caddisflies and stoneflies that salmon and trout rely on for food. They can also kill important predatory insects like dragonfly and damselfly larvae, aquatic beetles, and water striders. These insects help control mosquitoes, blackflies, and other pests.
  • Herbicides designed to kill weeds can also kill aquatic vegetation, cutting off the food supply for the entire aquatic food chain. The nitrogen and phosphorus in fertilizers, livestock waste, and pet waste are like vitamins. People need vitamins to live, but too much of some vitamins is toxic. Likewise, streams need phosphorus and nitrogen, but too much can cause severe problems. High nitrogen levels in water are also toxic to fish. Phosphorus is a major problem in many Snohomish County lakes.
  • Fertilizers dissolve in rainwater and wash into the soil. Some, but not all, of the fertilizer is absorbed and used by plants. The rest eventually migrates into streams, where it causes algae blooms. Algae blooms not only look bad, they consume dissolved oxygen in the water – oxygen that fish and other aquatic wildlife need to breathe. Cold-water fish species like salmon and trout require high oxygen levels.
    1. Wash Your Car at a Car Wash:  Fuel, oil, antifreeze, copper, and zinc are common pollutants from your vehicle. Fuel, oil, and antifreeze drip onto roads. Bits of copper and zinc wear off your brake pads and fall onto roads. Rain turns those powdered metals and chemicals into a poisonous soup that is sprayed over your vehicle as you drive. These pollutants and soap can flow into storm drains and ditches that discharge into your stream. Remember: Most storm drains flow directly to streams and rivers that flow into Puget Sound!

By washing your vehicle at a carwash, you can send those pollutants, along with your dirty soap, to a wastewater treatment plant where they belong.

If you do wash your car at home it is best to do so on the lawn or direct the soapsuds to the lawn. Soap in limited quantities will not harm your lawn, but is extremely damaging to fish and other aquatic life.

  1. Keep Pets out of Streams: Pets and livestock are hard on streams. They damage streamside vegetation, cause erosion, and trample salmon eggs. They disrupt spawning salmon, disturb wildlife, and harass juvenile fish. Like fertilizer, pet waste can cause severe nitrogen, phosphorus, and bacterial problems.

Map showing creeks, streams, ponds and lakes.

Draft Housing Strategy to Get Public Hearing June 13

dhs 2018If you were an elementary school teacher supporting a family of four and earning the average salary of $62,000 per year, what housing can you find in Edmonds? Remember: with that income, you could afford monthly rent and utilities of about $1,550, but the average rent for a three-bedroom apartment in Edmonds—if you can find it—is almost $1700 per month, not including utilities.   Housing has become harder to attain than ever. read more

Creative District Community Meeting June 7, 2018

Don't forget the Creative District Community Meeting this Thursday, June 7 at 6 p.m. in the Brackett Meeting Room at Edmonds City Hall. For more information click here.

Hekinan Gift of Cloisonné Art

Hekinan gift artworkEdmonds, WA – This year celebrates the 30th anniversary of the Sister City relationship established in 1988 between Hekinan, Japan and the City of Edmonds. In April 2018 May Earling led a delegation of local residents to Hekinan to celebrate the relationship as well as the 70th anniversary of the founding of the City of Hekinan. At that time Mayor Earling and Mary Negita exchanged gifts at a reception in Hekinan, with Edmonds receiving a framed cloisonné image of Mount Fuji from Hekinan. In late October Mayor Negita and a delegation of Hekinan residents will travel to Edmonds for a week. read more

Community Meeting Scheduled June 7 for Creative District Application

A community meeting is scheduled June 7th for Creative District Application. City engages public to ready itself for state application. For more information click here. 

New Website Promotes Visiting Edmonds

VisitEdmonds.com Has New Look & Feel, with Enhanced Functionality

(Edmonds, WA) - After several months of research, collaboration and hard work, the City of Edmonds is promoting its new and improved VisitEdmonds.com website. While the City has had a tourism-promotion website for several years, the current version of VisitEdmonds.com was just debuted earlier this year with a new look and feel, more photographs and imagery than ever, and a more comprehensive presentation of all that Edmonds has to offer. read more

Flag Lowering Honoring the Victims of the Tragedy in Santa Fe, Texas

flag half staffFriday, May 18, 2018 through Tuesday, March 22, 2018 ~ flags are to be flown at half-staff to honor the victims of the tragedy in Santa Fe, Texas.

Draft Housing Strategy Issued

OR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 18, 2018

 
Draft Housing Strategy issued

 
(Edmonds - WA) How the City of Edmonds can help meet housing needs is the subject of a draft housing strategy, just released.  It is online at www.edmondshousingstrategy.org.

The draft strategy recognizes different levels of need, from people with very low-incomes to typical young families, seniors, and others who seek affordable housing and more housing choices.

It suggests ideas for the City to incentivize affordable housing, reduce some code barriers, dedicate resources, and partner with non-profit organizations.  For example, a high priority is encouraging more housing near transit.  The City has already begun some actions to encourage more affordable housing, such as planning for growth in the Highway 99 area.

Highlights of the draft strategy will be featured at an open house on May 21, 6:00 pm, at City Hall, 3rd floor Brackett Room.  The open house kicks off the public review process. 

On May 23, the Planning Board will have an introduction to the draft strategy.  The Board will hold a public hearing on June 13. 

After further review and possible changes, the draft strategy will come before the City Council later this summer.  The Council will hold additional meetings, consider information and input, and decide what actions to take.

# # #

Housing Task Force Holds Open House

Housing Task Force Holds Open House

 
(Edmonds - WA) Housing needs and affordability—and what the City can do about it—will be the focus of an open house May 21, 6:00 to 7:30 pm, in the Brackett Room, Edmonds City Hall 3rd floor, 121 5th Ave. N.  A presentation will begin at 6:30.

The event is part of a public process for developing a strategy to increase the supply of affordable housing for a range of incomes and to meet diverse housing needs. 

“Given the cost of housing,” said Shane Hope, Development Services Director and the City’s lead on housing issues, “this is a very timely event.  Our mayor and city council are all very supportive of finding ways to meet the needs and they welcome community involvement.”

Before and after the 6:30 pm presentation, city staff will be available for questions and conversation.  Large display boards and handouts will be on view throughout the evening to show ideas being considered.

The Housing Strategy Task Force, appointed by Mayor Dave Earling last August, is sponsoring the open house for the City and will be considering the results.  By June, the Task Force expects to make a recommendation for a housing strategy. 

The draft strategy will get more public review and be considered by the Planning Board and the City Council over the summer.  Ultimately, the City Council will decide on any actions to adopt or implement the strategy.

For information about the Task Force or the City’s work to develop a housing strategy, see:  www.edmondshousingstrategy.org.

Edmonds Construction Standard Details Updated

NOW PUBLISHED - a complete update of the City of Edmonds Construction Standard Details.  Details are available on the Public Works & Utilities webpage in PDF and DWG formats.

Flag Lowering in Honor of Peace Officers Memorial Day

flag half staffTuesday, May 15, 2018 ~ in honor of Peace Officers Memorial Day flags will be flown at half-staff.

Urban Tree Plan Public Hearing May 9

Urban Tree Plan Public Hearing May 9
 
(Edmonds - WA) A draft Urban Forest Management Plan—sometimes called an urban tree plan—will be considered at a public hearing of the City’s Planning Board on May 9, 7:00 pm, at the Edmonds Council Chambers, 250 5th Ave N.
 
The draft plan was developed to provide guidance on managing the urban forest in Edmonds.  (The term “urban forest” means the trees in an urban area.)  The plan’s emphasis is on tree management at city properties and rights-of-way.  But some parts address both public and private property.

For more information about the draft plan, see the city website at:  http://www.edmondswa.gov/2011-07-27-22-31-43/urban-forest-mgmt-plan.html.
 
On April 5, the Tree Board reviewed the draft plan and, on April 19, interested citizens attended an open house about it.  A slightly revised draft will be considered at the May 9 public hearing.  The revisions make some clarifications and corrections to the background sections, but do not change the proposed recommendations.

 After the Planning Board’s May 9 public hearing, the Planning Board may have further discussion that same night and possibly at a follow-up meeting.  The draft plan then goes to the City Council, starting with a June 19 public hearing.  Ultimately, the Council will make the decision on adoption, amendment, or other action.

arts calendar2

Coming Events