bracketts landing 1 365x186

Visit a Park

To get more information about Edmonds Parks click here.
UFMP leaves module 01

Urban Forest Management Plan

We are in the process of developing an Urban Forest Management Plan. Click here for up-to-date project info.

Highway 99 photo graphic

Highway 99 Corridor / Subarea Planning

The Highway 99 Subarea Plan is a vision for land use and transportation along the corridor.  You can find more information here.
76th 212th Aerial

76th Ave & 212th St Intersection Improvements

Click here for project information and updates.

Stormwater Management
Streamside Landowners
Best Management Practices (BMPs)


We are lucky to live in one of the most wildlife-rich places in the world.. By ensuring that streamside activities have beneficial impacts instead of harmful impacts, and that they enhance habitat-forming natural processes instead of stopping them, you can improve stream health and wildlife habitat for generations to come.

The most important things you can do to create good wildlife habitat are also the most important things you can do for your stream:

    1. Leave Your Streambanks Natural:  Healthy streams are bordered by native trees and shrubs, and are crossed with fallen logs and roots that catch and hold sediment, leaves, and debris.  It may look untidy, but such natural clutter is essential to the health of rivers and streams.  Trees, shrubs, and roots, stabilize streambanks and reduce erosion.  Logs and branches in streams slow water velocity and protect streambanks and streamside plants from being swept away in high winter flows.  Fallen trees help create gravel bars where salmon and trout spawn.
    2. Plant Native Plants:  Native plants are suited to our local climate and soils so they don’t require watering, fertilizer, or pesticides. Native plants are hosts for many species of beneficial insects that serve as pollinators, food for salmon, trout and birds, and predators of harmful insects. They also provide seeds and fruit for birds. Salmon depend on native plants for shade, shelter (young salmon hide in overhanging shrubs at all times of the year), food (the mayflies, stoneflies, and caddisflies that salmon eat all need native plants), and leaf litter.
    3. Plant Trees: Shrubs, especially native shrubs, are very good for streams. Trees, however, provide many services that shrubs and smaller plants cannot. Living trees provide shade that keeps water cool. They provide food such as beneficial insects. They also provide leaves, needles, twigs and branches for the insects, amphibians and fish that live in the streams. Dead and fallen trees provide habitat for insects, amphibians and fish. They create pools that control sediment and nutrient movement. They slow the flow of water, reducing erosion and property damage.

Cartoon of fish.

    1. Limit Use of Lawn Chemicals:  Most lawn chemicals can harm your stream.
  • Pesticides designed to kill terrestrial insects can also kill aquatic insects such as the mayflies, caddisflies and stoneflies that salmon and trout rely on for food. They can also kill important predatory insects like dragonfly and damselfly larvae, aquatic beetles, and water striders. These insects help control mosquitoes, blackflies, and other pests.
  • Herbicides designed to kill weeds can also kill aquatic vegetation, cutting off the food supply for the entire aquatic food chain. The nitrogen and phosphorus in fertilizers, livestock waste, and pet waste are like vitamins. People need vitamins to live, but too much of some vitamins is toxic. Likewise, streams need phosphorus and nitrogen, but too much can cause severe problems. High nitrogen levels in water are also toxic to fish. Phosphorus is a major problem in many Snohomish County lakes.
  • Fertilizers dissolve in rainwater and wash into the soil. Some, but not all, of the fertilizer is absorbed and used by plants. The rest eventually migrates into streams, where it causes algae blooms. Algae blooms not only look bad, they consume dissolved oxygen in the water – oxygen that fish and other aquatic wildlife need to breathe. Cold-water fish species like salmon and trout require high oxygen levels.
    1. Wash Your Car at a Car Wash:  Fuel, oil, antifreeze, copper, and zinc are common pollutants from your vehicle. Fuel, oil, and antifreeze drip onto roads. Bits of copper and zinc wear off your brake pads and fall onto roads. Rain turns those powdered metals and chemicals into a poisonous soup that is sprayed over your vehicle as you drive. These pollutants and soap can flow into storm drains and ditches that discharge into your stream. Remember: Most storm drains flow directly to streams and rivers that flow into Puget Sound!

By washing your vehicle at a carwash, you can send those pollutants, along with your dirty soap, to a wastewater treatment plant where they belong.

If you do wash your car at home it is best to do so on the lawn or direct the soapsuds to the lawn. Soap in limited quantities will not harm your lawn, but is extremely damaging to fish and other aquatic life.

  1. Keep Pets out of Streams: Pets and livestock are hard on streams. They damage streamside vegetation, cause erosion, and trample salmon eggs. They disrupt spawning salmon, disturb wildlife, and harass juvenile fish. Like fertilizer, pet waste can cause severe nitrogen, phosphorus, and bacterial problems.

Map showing creeks, streams, ponds and lakes.

City Seeks New Economic Development Commission Members

As the Citizens Economic Development Commission (CEDC) nears its two-year anniversary, there are two open positions on the Commission. For more information please click here. For an application click here

Draft Tree Plan Comes Out

Draft Tree Plan Comes Out

(Edmonds – WA) A draft plan about managing trees in Edmonds, especially trees in public places, was issued today by the City of Edmonds.

The draft “Urban Forest Management Plan” is posted online or click here. It will be discussed at a public meeting of the Edmonds Citizens’ Tree Board at its April 5 meeting, 6:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers at 250 Fifth Avenue N., Edmonds.

“We really want public input on the draft plan,” said Shane Hope, the city’s development services director. An open house and other public meetings are being planned for April and May. More information is on the website and will be updated from time to time.

The draft plan calls for more activities to maintain the tree canopy in Edmonds and to proactively manage trees in public places.   Suggestions include: planting more trees, establishing a tree bank, inventorying public trees, updating city regulations, and launching a heritage tree program. Some activities would need more city resources; others might fit within existing programs.

After a public input period and consideration by the Tree Board and Planning Board, the draft urban forest management plan will be discussed by the City Council, probably starting in June. The City Council would decide whether to approve the plan with any changes.

Edmonds Waterfront Projects Receive Strong Support in Newly Released State Capital and Transportation Budgets

State Budgets Release $6 Million for Edmonds Street Waterfront Connector Project and $500,000 each for Edmonds Waterfront Center and Waterfront Park Redevelopment Project

(Edmonds, WA) - The City of Edmonds has much to celebrate in the newly released 2018 State Capital and Transportation Budgets, including $6 million for the Edmonds Street Waterfront Connector Project, a $500,000 grant for the new Edmonds Waterfront Center (currently the Edmonds Senior Center), and a $500,000 grant for the waterfront redevelopment and beach restoration in conjunction with the new Waterfront Center. read more

Student Representative being sought for Citizens' Tree Board

Tree Board Logo(Edmonds - WA) A student representative is being sought to serve on the Edmonds Citizens’ Tree Board. The Tree Board actively encourages the planting, protecting, and maintaining of trees for long-term community benefit.

"The Tree Board is a great community resource," Chair Doug Peterson recently noted, "and the student representative position is a special opportunity. We don’t currently have a student on the Tree Board and look forward to filling the position soon." Read more

Edmonds Street Waterfront Connector - Online Open House

Share your thoughts: February 28 – March 16

Edmonds Street Waterfront Connector Online Open House

Picture1 copy

The City is hosting an online open house introducing the Edmonds Street Waterfront Connector. Come explore different design concepts, evaluation criteria and take the opportunity to add your thoughts and perspectives to the project. The open house runs through March 16, and can be accessed here.

Flag Lowering in Memory of Reverend Billy Graham

flag half staffFriday, March 2, 2018 until close of business ~ By Presidential Proclamation, flags are to be lowered to half-staff as a mark of respect for the memory of Reverend Billy Graham on the day of his interment.

Highway 99 Revitalization/Gateway Project - Open House


An Open House will take place on Wednesday, March 7, 2018 from 6pm to 8pm at Swedish Hospital (21601 76th Ave. W - Auditorium C on 4th floor), regarding the Highway 99 Revitalization / Gateway project. Building from the Highway 99 Subarea Plan completed in 2017, the City is starting to make design decisions about how the corridor will look, feel, and function.

The project’s goal is to extend the successful transformation of Highway 99 in Shoreline through Edmonds and complete a safer corridor for all modes of transportation. Proposed transportation improvements along the corridor from 244th St. SW to 212th St. SW will be discussed, such as wider sidewalks, new street lighting, raised center medians for access management, attractive and safer crosswalks, better stormwater management, targeted utility replacements, potential undergrounding of overhead utilities, landscaping, and softscape treatments.

The Highway 99 Revitalization plan is funded by a grant from the State’s Connecting Washington transportation program. The project schedule, funding strategies and options for how project improvements may be phased over time will be discussed.

You are invited to participate in this open house to provide comments on the proposed improvements. We look forward to seeing you there. Additional information regarding the project can be accessed by going to the following website: http://www.edmondshwy99.org/ or contacting Mr. Bertrand Hauss (Transportation Engineer) at 425-771-0220 or bertrand.hauss@edmondswa.gov .

February 28th - Community Meeting for Edmonds Street Waterfront Connector

Join us February 28th from 6pm-8pm, at the Edmonds Library, Plaza Room, to share your feedback on early design concepts!

The Waterfront Connector will be a long-term solution at at-grade railroad crossing conflicts, allowing pedestrians and emergency vehicles safe and direct access to the waterfront. 

In 2016, after receiving significant input from the community, we completed the Waterfront At-Grade Crossings Alternatives Analysis. The study looked at a number of alternatives to provide safe and reliable access over the railroad tracks to the waterfront. The analysis conducted during that study recommended the Edmonds Street Waterfront Connector as the preferred solution. Mayor Earling presented this recommendation to City Council who unanimously endorsed the project in November 2016. 

You can learn more about the project and share your thoughts in-person on February 28th or online February 28th – March 16th. edmondswaterfrontaccess.org 

2018 State of the City Address

Mayor Earling's 2018 State of the City Address... press release

2018 SOC

Flag Lowering Honoring the Victims of the Tragedy in Parkland, Florida

flag half staffThursday, February 15, 2018 until close of business on Monday, February 19, 2018 ~ By Presidential Proclamation, flags are to be lowered to half-staff to honor the victims of the tragedy in Parkland, Florida.

Edmonds Diversity Commission Donates Book to Local Schools

you hold me upEdmonds Diversity Commission Donates Special Collection of Children’s Books to Local Elementary Schools

Diversity-Themed Books Aim to Support School District’s Mission to Provide a More Inclusive and Equitable Curriculum    

(Edmonds, WA) – In an effort to promote a greater understanding of diversity, equity and inclusion among Edmonds youth and support the Edmonds School District’s mission to provide a more equitable and diverse curriculum for its students, the City of Edmonds Diversity Commission has kicked off the new year with a substantial donation of children’s books to local elementary schools. The books focus on themes of diversity, equity, and inclusion and are intended to be available as resources for teachers, librarians, and students to help inform, engage, and encourage discussion. read more

arts calendar2

Coming Events